Martine McCutcheon dating

Monday, May 20th

2019.05.19 21:37 NotJ3st3r Monday, May 20th

Today are:

Have you ever wished you were a millionaire? Chances are you've dreamed of one day joining the club. But why wait anymore? Be a Millionaire Day is here! Today people try to become millionaires by sound practices— such as investing and saving, or by sheer luck—such as by buying lottery tickets and gambling. Does trying to become a millionaire sound like too much work? Some people may spend the day pretending they are already millionaires, by spending lavishly. And then there are those who are already millionaires, and they celebrate Be a Millionaire Day every day!
As of 2018, there are 42.2 million millionaires worldwide, with 17.3 million of them being in the United States, more than in any other country. They represent 7% of the US adult population or about 14% of US households. About 1,700 new people become millionaires in the United States every day. Following the United States, the countries with the most amount of millionaires are China, Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, and France. Altogether, these six countries make up 72% of the world's millionaires. When it comes to cities, as of 2018, the most millionaires in the world are in Tokyo. This is followed by New York City, London, Paris, Frankfurt, Beijing, Osaka, Hong Kong, and Shanghai.
There are a number of characteristics and statistics that help paint a picture of what type of people become millionaires and how they get there. About 80% of millionaires are first generation, and in a recent Fidelity's Millionaire Outlook Survey, 86% of millionaires said they made their own wealth and didn't inherit it. Similarly, a US Trust Insights on Wealth and Worth study found that only 22% of millionaires started in the upper class, while 78% began their lives either in the middle class or poor. However, well over a majority of millionaires said they grew up in households where academics and financial discipline were a focus. Becoming a millionaire doesn't happen overnight—about 80 percent of millionaires don't reach that state until they are at least 50.
Most millionaires spend less than an hour of their day watching television, and the same amount of time surfing the internet. But, almost 90% of millionaires spend at least a half an hour reading each day, and more than three out of four millionaires exercise at least four days a week. Millionaires tend to diversify their income—65% get their income from at least three sources. On average, millionaires save about 23% of their income. Over half of millionaires are business owners, and 84% have college degrees. These statistics can give some insight to those who wish to become millionaires.

Eliza Doolittle Day is celebrated by fans of the musical My Fair Lady, a musical based off of George Bernard Shaw's 1912 play Pygmalion. In the musical, Eliza Doolittle is a Cockney flower girl who wants to learn to speak properly. At the time the story takes place, proper speech was a symbol of upward mobility and education. Eliza meets Professor Henry Higgins in Covent Garden and he agrees to give her elocution lessons. Higgins believes he can transform her from someone who uses words like "ain't" to someone who can fit in with London's elite.
In the musical, Eliza dreams of meeting the king. She sings a song, "Just You Wait," to share her thoughts. It is in the song that the date for Eliza Doolittle Day comes from:
"One day I’ll be famous! I’ll be proper and prim; Go to St. James so often I will call it St. Jim! One evening the king will say: 'Oh, Liza, old thing, I want all of England your praises to sing. Next week on the twentieth of May I proclaim ‘Liza Doolittle Day!'"
Eliza Doolittle was first played on the stage by London actress Mrs. Patrick Campbell. She was played by Wendy Hiller in the 1938 film version of Pygmalion. Julie Andrews then played her on the stage version of My Fair Lady, while Professor Henry Higgins was played by Rex Harrison. Audrey Hepburn played Eliza Doolittle in the 1964 film adaptation of My Fair Lady, and Rex Harrison reprised his stage role for the film. Ironically, Audrey Hepburn was not nominated for an Academy Award for her portrayal of Eliza Doolittle, but the same year Julie Andrews won the Best Actress Academy Award for her role as Mary Poppins. Despite this, Hepburn received much praise for her role. Rex Harrison won Best Actor for his role as Professor Henry Higgins in the film.
In more recent years, other actresses have portrayed Doolittle. Martine McCutcheon portrayed her in the 2001 London revival of My Fair Lady. Lauren Ambrose played her in the 2018 production of My Fair Lady at Lincoln Center Theater on Broadway. Laura Benanti took over for Ambrose in October 2018 and continued to play Doolittle in 2019.

Today is Flower Day! It is unknown why May 20 is the holiday's date, although there is a Flower Day that takes place at the Eastern Market in Detroit on the Sunday after Mother's Day each year, which is around May 20. Flowers are revered by people because of their beauty and smell. They are associated with romance, medicine, rituals, and religion, and are even used as a food source. They are often used at christenings, for funerals and sympathy, for weddings and parties, as corsages and boutonnieres at social functions and holidays, and as home decorations. They are also used to worship goddesses, being brought by Hindu worshippers to temples.
There are some flower vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, and artichoke, and some flowers used as spices such as crocus—which produces saffron—cloves, and capers. Hops are used in beer, and dandelion and elder are used in wine. Flowers can also be used to make herbal teas.
Some flowers are associated with certain meanings. For example, red roses are associated with love, poppies with consolation after death, iris and lilies with burial, and daisies with innocence. Flowers have also been featured by writers in poetry and by artists in paintings.

Think of May 20 as young netizens’ Valentine’s Day. This is in addition to the other two lovers’ days that people celebrate in China: traditional Chinese lovers’ day, qixi, (七夕) on lunar July 7, and Western Valentine’s Day on February 14.

Happy Celebrating
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2018.06.30 20:10 gyman122 Finding The Best Offensive Line In NFL History: A Research Study

Hello, all. I’m back with my biggest spreadsheet and most stupidly long essay to date. Feel free to skip around to wherever suits you in this post, I promise I won't be mad. I'll include a brief summation table in a TL;DR at the bottom.
Sort of a repost of mine from nfl with some minor formatting changes, but I thought you all would be interested in it for obvious reasons.
Though the battle at the line of scrimmage is often characterized as overlooked, I expect that the enlightened and sophisticated browsers of KansasCityChiefs have at least some degree of knowledge when it comes to the debate over what unit is the greatest offensive line in NFL history. It’s a question I’ve pondered forever and, like many, I constantly found myself ill-equipped to have a serious discussion about with the current resources available online or in print. So I made this spreadsheet comparing and contrasting 14 of the NFL’s most formidable blocking units by their average statistics and percentiles in the categories of 1. Adjusted season rushing total, 2. Adjusted rushing touchdowns, 3. Rushing average, 4. Adjusted sacks allowed and 5. Sack percentage. I truly believe that this post may very well be the most comprehensive reference point one could ever have at their disposal when it comes to this debate.
Obviously, reference point is a crucial term. Nowhere in this post is there any definitive conclusion to this elusive question, and it is up to the reader to sift through the information to come to their own conclusion. Some may value different qualities differently and believe that it has more influence than another stat, and I have not tried to determine which hold priority over another. Another obvious factor is the lack of individual stats for linemen, making it almost impossible to separate their accomplishments from team accolades that are affected by the quality of surrounding skill position players.
For this “ranking”, which is more of a way for me to format this essay, I’ll be lining the 14 units up according to their Compiled Percentile/Average Score, a metric I literally just made up.
It's the combination of my two metrics I've used for ranking, first being Average Percentile Rank Score the sum of the given unit’s average league ranking across the five aforementioned statistical categories throughout their duration, converted to percentiles to account for the growing number of teams in the AFL/NFL since 1958. I’ve found this to be the best way to determine how dominant a given group was in the era in which they played, as opposed to my other made-up metric that I’ve similarly termed Statistical Average Rank Score which specifically contrasts these lines with one another to determine who had the best stats over these five categories, irrespective of the eras in which they played.
Without further ado, I’ll begin by acknowledging some honorable mentions. I won’t be mad if you choose to skip to the rankings themselves.
HONORABLE MENTIONS
80’S DOLPHINS
While one of the top tier lines in terms of pass blocking efficiency in the NFL’s history and being led by an NFL Hall of Famer in center Dwight Stephenson, there was one reason in particular that this squad didn’t make the 14 team cut. That reason is a common philosophical quandary often referred to as The Theseus' Ship Paradox. When the ancient Greek hero Theseus returned to Athens after years of heroism, his legendary ship was kept preserved plank by plank, replacing all of the rotted wood with new pieces. But when none of the planks from Theseus’ original voyage remained, was it still the same ship? In a similar train of thought, if the Dolphins had a consistently good offensive line from 1970 to 1991, but none of the same pieces remained from their inception, is it the same unit or do I have to make a different table for a new offensive line group? If the members of a legendary line are starting on one group but haven’t hit their stride, do I wait until their first subjectively “good” season? Ultimately, I decided that if at any point the former group levels off and is replaced by less than 3 players who have made a Pro Bowl in their career, the line ends. The only way to continue the legacy is to have constantly elite replacements, as is the case with a pair of groups on this list.
LANDRY’S COWBOYS IN THE 70’s
In many ways, it seems this line should absolutely qualify for the list. They consistently were top five in the league in rushing, a feat which generally leads to some of the best adjusted rushing totals in history. They won Super Bowls. They were propelled by an uber athletic prototype right tackle in Hall of Famer Rayfield Wright (probably the league’s sole safety-to-offensive tackle convert), and also employed the efforts of 3x All-Pro in tackle Ralph Neely on the other side and 2x All-Pro John Niland at the guard spot. I chose not to include them because their careers didn’t quite align smoothly. Just as Wright had finally hit his stride as an offensive lineman, Neely and Niland were on the tail end of their long careers.
80’S BENGALS
It felt only right to give this squad some credit, because for a few years they truly were about as good as it got. Left tackle Anthony Munoz is regarded by many as the best offensive lineman in the history of the sport, and right guard Max Montoya was a 4x Pro Bowler in the late 80’s and was established as one of the league’s best run blockers. They made Super Bowls in 1981 and 1988 largely on the backs of their deadly ground games, but ultimately this unit lacked the star power to make a compelling case for them.
CHUCK NOLL’S 70’S STEELERS
It was very, very hard for me to not find a place for this line in the top 14 due to the absolutely jaw-dropping rushing numbers they put up with Franco Harris and Rocky Bleier in the backfield (most notably in 1976). In Mike Webster, the Steel Curtain boasted one of the best centers in NFL history. Outside of him however, a no-name unit that maybe lacked the recognition they deserved in the smashmouth era of the 70’s. Despite gawdy statistics that belied the lack of individual honors, I’ve gotta have some standard and that’s just not enough household names to put on the list.
LATE 70’S PATRIOTS
Another team that just barely missed the cut. John Hannah is considered by football purists to be the quintessential offensive guard in league history, and in All-Pro tackle Leon Gray and one of the league’s best blocking tight ends of the era in Russ Francis I was tempted to just break the rules and throw them in. They broke the record for team rushing total in a season in 1978, but the astonishing thing is they actually averaged more yards a game in 1976 before there were 16 game season. Hannah was a killer and I wanted to represent him on the list, but Gray left for the Oilers in the early 80’s and outside of him there wasn’t much in terms of name recognition.
LATE 80’S OILERS
In Bruce Matthews and Mike Munchak you had two versatile Hall of Famers that no coach in history could turn down. But they lacked supporting talent and never quite had that “wow” season that set them apart as a historically dominant group.
LATE 2000’s JETS
A short-lived but very talented group. D’Brickashaw Ferguson, Damien Woody, Nick Mangold, and Alan Faneca were the nucleus of that entire team. They met at various stages of their career but for a season or two they were unmatched by any competition, and their 2009 season is still one of the best pro-style rushing seasons of the 21st century.
COWHER’S STEELERS
The road crew that paved the way for The Bus. Jeff Hartings was an All-Pro and orchestrated that blocking scheme to perfection, prime Alan Faneca was about as nasty as a football player can get and he’ll be a Hall of Famer before too long. Marvel Smith was a decent tackle for a while as well (made a Pro Bowl), but once again is two guys and some really good rushing seasons good enough? I don’t think so. Sorry Steelers fans, but this is your second group that just barely missed.
AND NOW…. THE MEAT
14. The Electric Company (1972-1977 Bills)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 6th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 14th, Average Stat Rank: 14th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 10th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 14th, Average Percentile Rank: 14th.
Hall of Famers: RG Joe DeLamielleure (3x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl).
Other notable members: LG Reggie McKenzie (3x All-Pro), LT Dave Foley (1x Pro Bowl).
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famer, 6x All-Pro, 7x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: O.J Simpson (5x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl, Hall of Fame)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: None
As I’ve previously mentioned in this post I made a few months ago, the Bills line that blocked for O.J Simpson in his prime produced some of the most jaw-dropping seasons in modern NFL history, at least in terms of rushing yardage. In 1973 and 1975, this group paved the way for the two best rushing seasons of the Super Bowl era, adjusted for 14 games they ran for 3,520 and 3,398 rushing yards respectively. In 1973, OJ Simpson rushed for an adjusted 2,289 yards. In 1975, he rushed for an adjusted 2,077 yards, which would be the third best mark in history, and fullback/human bulldozer Jim Braxton (who actually outweighed a few members of the Electric Company, and many opposing defensive linemen at almost 250 pounds) ran for an adjusted 941 yards. Imagine some guy today very nearly breaking the yardage record and then his backup rushing for almost 1,000 yards as well and you’ll understand the kind of ridiculous stuff the Bills were pulling in the 70’s.
Alas, this group never quite racked up the rushing touchdown numbers of their competitors save for a few seasons, and by my research rushing touchdowns is often the primary stat that separates the historically significant lines from the others. They also had the unfortunate dishonor of being by far the least effective pass-blocking group of the 14, and actually didn’t even crack the top half of the league when it came to preventing sacks in their era by any metric over the six years that they were together.
A big problem with critiquing them is that one could make a strong argument that they blocked for the worst quarterback of anyone on this list in Joe Ferguson, a below average passer to speak highly of him. He managed one good year in 1975 and was either the definition of a game manager or total hot garbage every other year.
The final issue of course was lack of team success. They made the playoffs once in 1974 despite ludicrous rushing numbers in an era where rushing was paramount, and were promptly crushed by the Steel Curtain. While I’ve never quite liked this argument since they never had a defense or quarterback to help them along, it shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone that history fails to remember those without championship rings, even when we’re discussing the offensive line.
13th. HOLMGREN’S SEAHAWKS (2001-2005)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 10th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 12th, Average Stat Rank: 13th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 7th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 13th, Average Percentile Rank: 12th.
Hall of Famers: LT Walter Jones (6x All-Pro, 9x Pro Bowl).
Other notable members: LG Steve Hutchinson (7x All-Pro, 7x Pro Bowl), C Robbie Tobeck (1x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famer, 13x All-Pro, 17x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Shaun Alexander (3x Pro Bowl 2003-2005, 2x All-Pro 2004-2005)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Matt Hasselbeck (1x Pro Bowl 2003)
Probably a bit of a surprise for many to see this group included. Probably the only line on this list that really had a side that never really became anything more than serviceable, nonetheless that left side of Walter Jones and Steve Hutchinson was about as good as anyone could ever ask for. Two of the best players at their position of the decade in their primes, both Hall of Famers (Hutchinson will be, I have no doubts), just absolutely smashing the opposition to pieces.
Tobeck was a good center as well, and one that probably should have made more than just his one Pro Bowl.
Obviously though, having two guys on the right side who played average at best led to some pretty rough pass protecting numbers.
Where the team shined was on the goalline, where the Seahawks could run a toss or power play to the left and pile up touchdowns on the ground with Shaun Alexander. This culminated in Alexander’s record-breaking MVP season in 2005 and a Super Bowl run that really put this group in the public consciousness.
T10th. LOMBARDI’S PACKERS (1959-1968)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 3rd, Passing Stat Average Rank: 13th, Average Stat Rank: 10th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 6th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 12th, Average Percentile Rank: 11th.
Hall of Famers: RG Jerry Kramer (7x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl), RT Forrest Gregg (9x All-Pro, 9x Pro Bowl), C Jim Ringo (9x All-Pro, 10x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: LG Fuzzy Thurston (4x All-Pro), LT Bob Skoronski (1x Pro Bowl), G Gale Gillingham (2x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 3 Hall of Famers, 32x All-Pro, 28x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Paul Hornung (2x All-Pro 1960-1961, 3x Pro Bowl 1959-1961), Jim Taylor (1x All-Pro 1962, 5x Pro Bowl 1960-1964) Tom Moore (1x Pro Bowl 1962), Donnie Anderson (1x Pro Bowl 1968)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Bart Starr (1x All-Pro 1966, 3x Pro Bowl 1960-1962, 1966)
Yeesh, that’s a lot of accolades.
This group kind of wrote the book on scoring touchdowns. Their adjusted total of 41.143 in 1962 is still to this day the best single season output for rushing touchdowns, and they had a few years that weren’t too far off. They had the most average touchdowns scored of any line in history.
Vince Lombardi’s famed Packer Sweep was almost an automatic touchdown anywhere within the ten yard line, mostly due to the dominance and flexibility of his tough, athletic and aggressive offensive line.
It’s tough to look at all those Hall of Famers and those combined accolades (although in a smaller NFL, it meant a little less) and find any fault, but there’s a reason they aren’t higher. To put it simply, this team just wasn’t good at pass-blocking. The only line on the list that allowed more sacks than them were the Electric Company, and this Packers group doesn’t have the luxury of claiming that their quarterback sucked because they protected Hall of Fame quarterback Bart Starr.
But if you value the accolades and touchdowns, this is your group.
T10th. 70’S-80’S RAMS (1976-1987)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 7th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 10th, Average Stat Rank: 11th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 8th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 10th, Average Percentile Rank: 9th.
Hall of Famers: RT Jackie Slater (5x All-Pro, 7x Pro Bowl), LG Tom Mack (8x All-Pro, 11x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: C Rich Saul (2x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), RG Dennis Harrah (1x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), LT Doug France (3x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl), LG Kent Hill (5x Pro Bowl), C Doug Smith (6x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 2 Hall of Famers, 19x All-Pro, 44x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Lawrence McCutcheon (2x Pro Bowl 1976-1977) Eric Dickerson (3x All-Pro 1983-1984, 1986. 3x Pro Bowl 1983-1984, 1986) Charles White (1x All-Pro 1987, 1x Pro Bowl 1987)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Pat Haden (1x Pro Bowl 1977)
Los Angeles could not stop stumbling into awesome offensive linemen in the 70’s and 80’s.
I was tempted to start this group’s table earlier because I actually missed their best season in 1973, but ultimately I decided the “core” of the group wasn’t quite established yet to be considered.
It didn’t matter who was in the backfield for nearly 20 years; if you were on the Rams you were going to get your yards. It didn’t matter if you were a pretty good back like Lawrence McCutcheon and Charles White, an all-time great like Eric Dickerson, or a committee backfield full of JAGs like the Rams had throughout the late 70’s. Whatever you were capable of, you were capable of twice as much with this group. They blocked for Eric Dickerson when he broke the single season rushing record, if that doesn’t tell you enough.
While they were by no means an elite pass blocking team throughout history, they were in many seasons amongst the best pass blocking teams of their era. All in all, a massively underappreciated but consistently dominant squad for a long, long time.
T10th. GREAT WALL OF DALLAS (1989-2000 Cowboys)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 13th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 5th, Average Stat Rank: 12th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 11th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 4th, Average Percentile Rank: 8th.
Hall of Famers: G Larry Allen (7x All-Pro, 11x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: LG Nate Newton (2x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), RT Erik Williams, (3x All-Pro, 4x Pro Bowl), LT Mark Tuinei (2x Pro Bowl) Mark Stepnoski (3x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), G Kevin Gogan (1x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl), LT Flozell Adams (1x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), C Ray Donaldson (6x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famer, 17x All-Pro, 42x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Emmitt Smith (4x All-Pro 1992-1995, 7x Pro Bowl 1991-1995, 1998-1999)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Troy Aikman (6x Pro Bowl 1991-1996)
For most, I think this is the line that comes to mind when you’re asked “who was the greatest offensive line of all time”?
And let me be clear, this isn’t a bad answer at all. This line (in my opinion) single-handedly started an arms race in the NFL to get the biggest and baddest guys that you could on one line to just beat the shit out of anyone you played against. To this day, one of the most physically talented and imposing groups of men in history. I attribute the massive ballooning in size of the average lineman in the 90’s to the success that this group achieved by virtue of the fact that no one was strong enough to handle the power they possessed. In big games, this group had a tendency to absolutely crush defenses.
Blocking for the NFL’s all-time leading rusher is a resume builder all by itself, not to mention that year in and year out they kept Troy Aikman as clean as any QB in the league. What’s most impressive to me is how they were able to stay consistently good for so long. It helped having Larry Allen (who I consider to be the best offensive lineman of all time), who was an incredibly versatile player who could perform at near an All-Pro level at any of the four offensive line positions outside of center. Erik Williams for almost a half decade looked to be Hall of Fame bound, constantly shutting down the likes of Reggie White and Chris Doleman before a car accident cut his elite career short.
T8th. 1972-1978 ST. LOUIS CARDINALS
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 12th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 2nd, Average Stat Rank: 6th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 14th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 2nd, Average Percentile Rank: 13th.
Hall of Famers: RT Dan Dierdorf (6x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl).
Other notable members: RG Conrad Dobler (3x Pro Bowl), LT Ernie McMillan (4x Pro Bowl), LG Bob Young (1x All-Pro, 2x Pro Bowl).
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famer, 7x All-Pro, 15x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Terry Metcalf (3x Pro Bowl 1974-1975, 1977), Jim Otis (1x Pro Bowl 1975)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Jim Hart (4x Pro Bowl 1974-1977)
The best pass blocking offensive line of all-time is this low on the list? Kind of an example of why I included a few metrics that you can sift through, because once again this group was responsible for some really historic stuff that has rarely been seen again. They allowed only 9.1 adjusted sacks in 1975 (then an NFL record), and led the league in fewest sacks allowed three years in a row from 1974-1976 and led the league in lowest sack percentage from 1974-1978. That’s a very, very long time to be absolutely shutting down opposing pass rushes year in and year out. They even boasted a few pretty solid rushing seasons and consistently had strong rushing touchdown numbers, notably in 1975.
Ultimately though, the Cardinals took a while to find their wings. Conrad Dobler and Bob Young started for years before they became Pro Bowl players, Ernie McMillan was towards the end of his career when they started hitting their stride. Dan Dierdorf was the only constant that held everything together so there was a span I’ve included where they weren’t playing at peak performance and it hurt their averages. Overall though, really strong contender for best offensive line ever.
T8th. DAVIS' RAIDERS (1966-1977)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 9th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 8th, Average Stat Rank: 9th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 9th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 7th, Average Percentile Rank: 10th.
Hall of Famers: LT Art Shell (4x All-Pro, 8x Pro Bowl), LG Gene Upshaw (7x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl) C Jim Otto (3x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl, all of the AFL accolades)
Other notable members: Bob Brown (Hall of Fame, 9x All-Pro, 6x-Pro Bowl, 2 each with Raiders), C Dave Dalby (1x Pro Bowl), RT Harry Schuh (1x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 3 (4) Hall of Famers, 24x All-Pro, 24x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl/All-AFL RB seasons: Clem Daniels (1x All-AFL 1966, 1x AFL All-Star 1966), Hewritt Dixon (1x All-AFL 1968, 3x AFL All-Star 1966-1968, 1x Pro Bowl 1970), Marv Hubbard (3x Pro Bowl 1971-1973)
Pro Bowl/All-AFL QB seasons: Tom Flores (AFL All-Star 1966), Daryle Lamonica (2x All-AFL 1967, 1969. 2x AFL All-Star 1967, 1969. 2x Pro Bowl 1970, 1972), Ken Stabler (4x Pro Bowl 1973-1974, 1976-1977. 1x All-Pro 1974)
Another star studded group.
I had the luxury of having to do percentiles for the 9 and 10 team AFL for this one, which throws off the general percentile averages a bit. But still, a line with three guys who made the NFL Network’s Top 100 Players of All-Time list a couple of years ago (another Hall of Famer if you count Bob Brown, who played at a pretty high level in his last 3 years with the Raiders). They were a consistently good pass blocking group for eleven years (an impressive feat by itself). Perhaps an even stronger case for this group is that they never had a running back who wasn’t a total bozo JAG nobody. They generally ran a running back by committee that struggled with yards per carry but was a constant force that wore down the opposition and racked up a fair amount of touchdowns.
What I love most is that this group was born through necessity. Oakland constantly had problems in the late AFL with beating Kansas City, because Kansas City had one of the best defensive lines in pro football at the time with Buck Buchanan, Curley Culp and Jerry Mays. So Al Davis strapped down and started investing everything he could in offensive line, and when the Steel Curtain seemed unstoppable they knew the only way to beat them was to go through them. Their time together concluded with an amazing performance in 1976 in which they beat up on the heavily favored Vikings and yet another defensive line that many saw as unbeatable.
7. THE HOGS (1981-1992 Redskins)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 11th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 4th, Average Stat Rank: 7th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 12th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 3rd, Average Percentile Rank: 7th.
Hall of Famers: G Russ Grimm (4x All-Pro, 4x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: T Joe Jacoby (3x All-Pro, 4x Pro Bowl), C Jim Lachey (4x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl), C Jeff Bostic (1x All-Pro, 1x Pro Bowl), RG Mark May (1x Pro Bowl), G R.C Thielemann (1x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl), G Mark Schlereth (2x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famers, 4x All-Pro, 18x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: John Riggins (1x All-Pro 1983, 1x Pro Bowl 1983), Earnest Byner (2x Pro Bowl 1990-1991)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Joe Theismann (1x All-Pro 1983, 2x Pro Bowl 1982-1983), Mark Rypien (2x Pro Bowl 1989, 1991)
One of the most storied lines in history, well known for their awesome nickname and being the fuel for The Diesel in 1983 when John Riggins broke the record for touchdowns by a running back in a season and won the Super Bowl.
While a line with some decent end-of-year awards to their name (Russ Grimm a pretty famous name as both a player and coach, Jacoby as one of the first 300 pounders to make a name for himself as an elite-level talent), I was somewhat underwhelmed by the statistics and accolades for this group. Then I remembered that their best running back was 34 years old and their best quarterback was from the CFL, and those really impressive sack and rushing touchdown numbers start to mean a little more. Not to mention the quality of longevity; this group was together for almost 11 years and consistently were able to have strong seasons.
6. PAYTON’S SAINTS (2007-2011)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 14th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 1st, Average Stat Rank: 8th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 13th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 1st, Average Percentile Rank: 6th.
Hall of Famers: None.
Other notable members: LG Carl Nicks (2x All-Pro, 2x Pro Bowl), RG Jahri Evans (5x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), C Jonathan Goodwin (1x Pro Bowl), Jammal Brown (1x All-Pro, 2x Pro Bowl) Jermon Bushrod (2x Pro Bowl), RT Zach Strief (1x PFF All-Pro?)
Total Accolades: 7x All-Pro, 11x Pro Bowl, 1x PFF All-Pro (hell yeah)
Pro Bowl RB seasons: None.
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Drew Brees (2x All-Pro 2009, 2011. 5x Pro Bowl 2007-2011)
Probably the most unlikely group to have made this list, and for good reason. While a really good group, I overestimated some things before delving in further.
I’ll start by saying this; in no way do I think this wasn’t a good offensive line. In fact, for a few years in that time span I definitely wouldn’t hesitate to say there were probably the most effective group. Even though they have been our smallest sample thus far, the fact that they were able to have such consistent pass blocking success in a 32 team league in order to come to the percentile scores they did is a pretty good look (and I love Drew Brees, but I don’t know if I’d call him Brady/Manning esque when it comes to avoiding sacks with quick releases). Not to mention they even managed to throw in a few years where they had a pretty damn intimidating run game without really having much in the way of talent in their backfield. Winning a Super Bowl in 2009 makes a strong case as well. But when you compare them to a line that was almost equally as good at pass protection like the 70’s Cardinals who did it for almost twice as long, it’s tough to compare them.
The problem with them is that
a) they weren’t together all that long.
b) they never had much of a commitment to the run game.
c) there really wasn’t a clear cut “leader”. Jahri Evans made a lot of Pro Bowls in a row, but I think for the years where he was at his best Carl Nicks was probably the best player on that line.
5. THE NEW GREAT WALL (2014-Present Cowboys)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 8th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 3rd, Average Stat Rank: 5th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 1st, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 9th, Average Percentile Rank: 3rd.
Hall of Famers: None, yet
Other notable members: LT Tyron Smith (4x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), RG Zack Martin (4x All-Pro, 4x Pro Bowl), C Travis Frederick (3x All-Pro, 4x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 11x All-Pro, 13x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: DeMarco Murray (1x All-Pro 2014, 1x Pro Bowl 2014), Ezekiel Elliott (1x All-Pro 2016, 1x Pro Bowl 2016
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Tony Romo (1x Pro Bowl 2014), Dak Prescott (1x Pro Bowl 2016)
This may come on a little strong, but I fully believe that this group will go down as one of the best in history.
Obviously their position in this “ranking” is corrupted by the fact that they only have four seasons to judge them by and they will obviously go through a 'down' season sometime, but in a lot of ways the pieces are there.
Zack Martin has been the best guard in the entire NFL since day one and I have almost no doubts that he’ll become a Hall of Famer, if not one of the best guards ever, at this rate. Tyron Smith is consistently considered the best tackle, or at least top three, in the league. Travis Frederick isn’t far off from being considered the best center of this era. This is a seriously unique, especially talented young group that we’re dealing with in the modern age. To see them year in and year out get all of these accolades while on the same group is a remarkable achievement, not to mention how the ‘ancillary’ players like Ronald Leary and Doug Free are fringe Pro Bowlers themselves.
Their performance with Elliott his rookie year was astounding, a rookie hasn’t made such a strong impression from that position since Eric Dickerson and he has his line to thank for that. As the Cowboys continue to invest in the offensive line positions and keep a focus on maintaining this group, the small part of me that doesn’t despise Jerry Jones more than any other football personality wants this team to win a Super Bowl at some point to cement their legacy as one of the best groups of all time.
T3rd. 70’S DOLPHINS (1971-1979)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 2nd, Passing Stat Average Rank: 9th, Average Stat Rank: 2nd, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 5th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 8th, Average Percentile Rank: 5th.
Hall of Famers: RG Larry Little (7x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), C Jim Langer (6x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: Bob Kuechenberg (3x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), RT Norm Evans (2x Pro Bowl) C Bob DeMarco (3x Pro Bowl), LT Wayne Moore (1x Pro Bowl), RT Mike Current (1x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 2 Hall of Famers, 16x All-Pro, 24x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Larry Csonka (3x All-Pro 1971-1973, 4x Pro Bowl 1971-1974), Mercury Morris (2x Pro Bowl 1972-1973) Delvin Williams (1x All-Pro 1978, 1x Pro Bowl 1978)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Bob Griese (2x All-Pro 1971, 1977. 5x Pro Bowl 1971, 1973-1974, 1977-1978), Earl Morrall (1x All-Pro 1972)
The line that propelled the famed undefeated season in 1972, this group has a very strong case for best of all time.
While maybe not the most star-studded, consistently was a top five group in almost every respect from pass blocking to road grading. Paving the way for Csonka, Kiick and Morris in 1972 they set an insane precedent for how to win in the 70’s by rushing for 3383 adjusted yards and almost 30 touchdowns. While this record was later broken by the Electric Company Bills in the following year, the fact that Shula rode this running game all the way to NFL history like he did is an achievement all their own.
They could have stood to be a little better in pass protection, even though the game managers they blocked for owed them their careers. When Bob Griese went down in 1972, this group didn’t even flinch and rode backup Earl Morrall to an All-Pro undefeated season, despite the fact he couldn’t step up into a pocket to save his life. Even when Csonka, Kiick and Morris all left the team, this group continued to have really strong run games.
T3. BROWN’S BROWNS (1958-1967)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 1st, Passing Stat Average Rank: 11th, Average Stat Rank: 3rd, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 4th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 11th, Average Percentile Rank: 4th.
Hall of Famers: LT/K Lou Groza (6x All-Pro, 9x Pro Bowl), RT Mike McCormack (9x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), RG Gene Hickerson (7x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: LG Jim Ray Smith (5x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), C Art Hunter (1x Pro Bowl), C John Morrow (2x Pro Bowl), LT Dick Schafrath (4x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), RG John Wooten (1x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 3 Hall of Famers, 31x All-Pro, 36x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Jim Brown (6x All-Pro 1958-1961, 1963-1965. 7x Pro Bowl 1958-1965) Leroy Kelly (2x All-Pro 1966-1967, 2x Pro Bowl 1966-1967)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Milt Plum (2x Pro Bowl 1960-1961), Frank Ryan (3x Pro Bowl 1964-1966)
The pairing of this group and Jim Brown goes down as one of the finest in history, and presents an interesting question.
Obviously, Jim Brown was good at football. Obviously, this was an exceptional offensive line. The stats can back up both of these conclusions. The Browns, on average, ranked 1.9th league wide in yards per carry through the ten years of this group’s existence, a remarkable 7 out of 10 times having led the league and never once dropping out of the top 5. In my opinion, that’s the single most impressive stat on the entire spreadsheet.
Jim Brown broke and still holds the record for yards per carry for a running back, in spite of the Browns’ quarterbacks and defenses being largely mediocre if not worse. The Browns won two championships in this span, and the line continued to produce All-Pro seasons when Leroy Kelly replaced Jim Brown in 1966.
They weren’t quite the best pass blockers to ever exist, as a matter of fact they were generally middle of the road or a smidgen above that mark. But their ridiculous, unbreakable records when it comes to pounding the ball more than overcomes any deficiencies they had in that regard.
2. SHANAHAN’S BRONCOS (1995-1999)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 5th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 6th, Average Stat Rank: 4th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 3rd, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 5th, Average Percentile Rank: 1st.
Hall of Famers: Gary Zimmerman (8x All-Pro, 7x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: C Tom Nalen (3x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), G Mark Schlereth (2x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famer, 12x All-Pro, 14x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Terrell Davis (3x All-Pro 1996-1998, 3x Pro Bowl 1996-1998)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: John Elway (3x Pro Bowl 1996-1998)
Surprised to see this group anti-climatically come close to the top of the list? You have nothing on me, who after hours and hours compiling this spreadsheet had to come to grips with the fact that, according to my metrics, this seemingly unremarkable group was the second best offensive line ever.
After a while, I came to grips with it. It’s hard to argue that this wasn’t a dominant span of offensive for a group of linemen. Even if you say Elway’s pocket presence influenced the sack numbers and Shanahan’s newfangled zone-blocking scheme influenced the run game, the fact remains that over the very short duration that this group was together they were undoubtedly better than almost every other line in the league, to a degree that no other line on this list has been for their duration.
They led the league in rushing multiple times, they protected the quarterback with a frequency that any offensive coordinator would want, and they won two Super Bowls in a row. That’s quite a bevy of accomplishments over five years (even if that isn’t exactly the largest sample size).
At the same time, it raises all of the concerns I have with this model. This group holds this spot on the rankings because (as I make clear in this other post detailing the top 100 rushing offenses of all time) the 90’s sucked when it came to rushing offense. It took a pretty moderately good season in the scope of things to lead the league or be top five in rushing in the decade, so the meh totals that we saw from this group tended to dominate the NFL landscape of the time.
1. VERMEIL’S CHIEFS (2001-2006)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 4th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 7th, Average Stat Rank: 1st, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 2nd, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 6th, Average Percentile Rank: 2nd.
Hall of Famers: LT Willie Roaf (9x All-Pro, 11x Pro Bowl), RG Will Shields (7x All-Pro, 12x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: LG Brian Waters (2x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl, 1x AFC Ground Player of the Week), C Casey Wiegmann (1x Pro Bowl), RT John Tait (1x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 2 Hall of Famers, 18x All-Pro, 31x Pro Bowl, 1x AFC Ground Player of the Week
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Priest Holmes (3x All-Pro 2001-2003, 3x Pro Bowl 2001-2003), Larry Johnson (2x All-Pro 2005-2006, 2x Pro Bowl 2005-2006)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Trent Green (2x Pro Bowl 2003, 2005)
If you all would allow me to show my hand, this is probably my pick as the best offensive line ever, at least to this point. You can back it up with accolades, average score, percentile score or compiled score, or with the players they blocked for. Fact is, if you had this group in front of you, you could take any average player or journeyman off the street and play at a Hall of Fame level.
They weren’t together for too long. The Chiefs lucked out with Roaf and Shields playing some of their best football on the absolute final stretch of their careers, having underperforming first round tackle John Tait play much better on the right side, Wiegmann being the line manager they needed and former college fullback/tight end Brian Waters somehow emerging into one of the best guards in the league but somehow for a five year span this was as good an offensive line that ever existed.
For three years in a row they led the 32 team NFL in rushing touchdowns (and never dropped out of the top six in their time together), breaking Emmitt Smith’s record from 1995 by paving the way for Priest Holmes to score 28 touchdowns in 2003 (and as I detail in this post, that wasn’t even close to his best season behind this group).
Blocking for Larry Johnson in 2005 without Tait, they may have even been better. Had Johnson started the entire season, his per game averages extrapolated into the best season a running back has ever had, ever. I hardly find it a coincidence that two of the best running back seasons of all time and one of the best red zone offenses in NFL history were spearheaded by this incredible group.
TL;DR:
If you think it's important to rank these units by how good they were at the time they played, I would generally judge by the Percentile Score. If you think the should be judged irrespective of time, use Average Score. For a combination of both, use Compiled Score.
Accolades Compiled Score Rank Average Rank Percentile Rank
1971-1977 Bills 1 HOF, 6x All-Pro 7x Pro Bowl 14th 14th 14th
2001-2005 Seahawks 1 HOF, 13x All-Pro, 17x Pro Bowl 13th 13th 12th
1959-1968 Packers 3 HOF, 32x All-Pro, 28x Pro Bowl T10th 9th 11th
1976-1987 Rams 2 HOF, 19x All-Pro, 44x Pro Bowl T10th 11th 9th
1989-2000 Cowboys 1 HOF, 17x All-Pro, 42x Pro Bowl T10th 12th 8th
1972-1978 Cardinals 1 HOF, 7x All-Pro, 15x Pro Bowl T8th 6th 13th
1966-1977 Raiders 3 (4?) HOF, 24x All-Pro, 24x Pro Bowl T8th 9th 10th
1981-1992 Redskins 1 HOF, 14x All-Pro, 18x Pro Bowl 7th T8th 7th
2007-2011 Saints 7x All-Pro, 11x Pro Bowl 6th 8th 6th
2014-2018 Cowboys 11x All-Pro, 13x Pro Bowl 5th 5th 3rd
1971-1979 Dolphins 2 HOF, 16x All-Pro, 24x Pro Bowl T3rd 2nd 5th
1958-1967 Browns 3 HOF, 31x All-Pro, 36x Pro Bowl T3rd 3rd 4th
1995-1999 Broncos 1 HOF, 12x All-Pro, 14x Pro Bowl 2nd 3rd 1st
2001-2006 Chiefs 2 HOF, 18x All-Pro, 31x Pro Bowl 1st 1st 2nd
All stats compiled on Pro Football Reference.
After seemingly months of torture over this project, I’m out. Remember to like, comment and subscribe.
submitted by gyman122 to KansasCityChiefs [link] [comments]


2018.06.27 16:23 gyman122 Finding the Best Offensive Line in NFL History: A Research Study

Hello, all. I’m back with my biggest spreadsheet and most stupidly long essay to date. Feel free to skip around to wherever suits you in this post, I promise I won't be mad. I'll include a brief summation table in a TL;DR at the bottom.
Though the battle at the line of scrimmage is often characterized as overlooked, I expect that the enlightened and sophisticated browsers of nfl have at least some degree of knowledge when it comes to the debate over what unit is the greatest offensive line in NFL history. It’s a question I’ve pondered forever and, like many, I constantly found myself ill-equipped to have a serious discussion about with the current resources available online or in print. So I made this spreadsheet comparing and contrasting 14 of the NFL’s most formidable blocking units by their average statistics and percentiles in the categories of 1. Adjusted season rushing total, 2. Adjusted rushing touchdowns, 3. Rushing average, 4. Adjusted sacks allowed and 5. Sack percentage. I truly believe that this post may very well be the most comprehensive reference point one could ever have at their disposal when it comes to this debate.
Obviously, reference point is a crucial term. Nowhere in this post is there any definitive conclusion to this elusive question, and it is up to the reader to sift through the information to come to their own conclusion. Some may value different qualities differently and believe that it has more influence than another stat, and I have not tried to determine which hold priority over another. Another obvious factor is the lack of individual stats for linemen, making it almost impossible to separate their accomplishments from team accolades that are affected by the quality of surrounding skill position players.
For this “ranking”, which is more of a way for me to format this essay, I’ll be lining the 14 units up according to their Average Percentile Score, a metric I literally just made up. In short, it’s the sum of the given unit’s average league ranking across the five aforementioned statistical categories throughout their duration, converted to percentiles to account for the growing number of teams in the AFL/NFL since 1958. I’ve found this to be the best way to determine how dominant a given group was in the era in which they played, as opposed to my other made-up metric that I’ve similarly termed Statistical Average Rank Score which specifically contrasts these lines with one another to determine who had the best stats over these five categories, irrespective of the eras in which they played.
Without further ado, I’ll begin by acknowledging some honorable mentions. I won’t be mad if you choose to skip to the rankings themselves.
HONORABLE MENTIONS
80’S DOLPHINS
While one of the top tier lines in terms of pass blocking efficiency in the NFL’s history and being led by an NFL Hall of Famer in center Dwight Stephenson, there was one reason in particular that this squad didn’t make the 14 team cut. That reason is a common philosophical quandary often referred to as The Theseus' Ship Paradox. When the ancient Greek hero Theseus returned to Athens after years of heroism, his legendary ship was kept preserved plank by plank, replacing all of the rotted wood with new pieces. But when none of the planks from Theseus’ original voyage remained, was it still the same ship? In a similar train of thought, if the Dolphins had a consistently good offensive line from 1970 to 1991, but none of the same pieces remained from their inception, is it the same unit or do I have to make a different table for a new offensive line group? If the members of a legendary line are starting on one group but haven’t hit their stride, do I wait until their first subjectively “good” season? Ultimately, I decided that if at any point the former group levels off and is replaced by less than 3 players who have made a Pro Bowl in their career, the line ends. The only way to continue the legacy is to have constantly elite replacements, as is the case with a pair of groups on this list.
LANDRY’S COWBOYS IN THE 70’s
In many ways, it seems this line should absolutely qualify for the list. They consistently were top five in the league in rushing, a feat which generally leads to some of the best adjusted rushing totals in history. They won Super Bowls. They were propelled by an uber athletic prototype right tackle in Hall of Famer Rayfield Wright (probably the league’s sole safety-to-offensive tackle convert), and also employed the efforts of 3x All-Pro in tackle Ralph Neely on the other side and 2x All-Pro John Niland at the guard spot. I chose not to include them because their careers didn’t quite align smoothly. Just as Wright had finally hit his stride as an offensive lineman, Neely and Niland were on the tail end of their long careers.
80’S BENGALS
It felt only right to give this squad some credit, because for a few years they truly were about as good as it got. Left tackle Anthony Munoz is regarded by many as the best offensive lineman in the history of the sport, and right guard Max Montoya was a 4x Pro Bowler in the late 80’s and was established as one of the league’s best run blockers. They made Super Bowls in 1981 and 1988 largely on the backs of their deadly ground games, but ultimately this unit lacked the star power to make a compelling case for them.
CHUCK NOLL’S 70’S STEELERS
It was very, very hard for me to not find a place for this line in the top 14 due to the absolutely jaw-dropping rushing numbers they put up with Franco Harris and Rocky Bleier in the backfield (most notably in 1976). In Mike Webster, the Steel Curtain boasted one of the best centers in NFL history. Outside of him however, a no-name unit that maybe lacked the recognition they deserved in the smashmouth era of the 70’s. Despite gawdy statistics that belied the lack of individual honors, I’ve gotta have some standard and that’s just not enough household names to put on the list.
LATE 70’S PATRIOTS
Another team that just barely missed the cut. John Hannah is considered by football purists to be the quintessential offensive guard in league history, and in All-Pro tackle Leon Gray and one of the league’s best blocking tight ends of the era in Russ Francis I was tempted to just break the rules and throw them in. They broke the record for team rushing total in a season in 1978, but the astonishing thing is they actually averaged more yards a game in 1976 before there were 16 game season. Hannah was a killer and I wanted to represent him on the list, but Gray left for the Oilers in the early 80’s and outside of him there wasn’t much in terms of name recognition.
LATE 80’S OILERS
In Bruce Matthews and Mike Munchak you had two versatile Hall of Famers that no coach in history could turn down. But they lacked supporting talent and never quite had that “wow” season that set them apart as a historically dominant group.
LATE 2000’s JETS
A short-lived but very talented group. D’Brickashaw Ferguson, Damien Woody, Nick Mangold, and Alan Faneca were the nucleus of that entire team. They met at various stages of their career but for a season or two they were unmatched by any competition, and their 2009 season is still one of the best pro-style rushing seasons of the 21st century.
COWHER’S STEELERS
The road crew that paved the way for The Bus. Jeff Hartings was an All-Pro and orchestrated that blocking scheme to perfection, prime Alan Faneca was about as nasty as a football player can get and he’ll be a Hall of Famer before too long. Marvel Smith was a decent tackle for a while as well (made a Pro Bowl), but once again is two guys and some really good rushing seasons good enough? I don’t think so. Sorry Steelers fans, but this is your second group that just barely missed.
AND NOW…. THE MEAT
14. The Electric Company (1972-1977 Bills)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 6th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 14th, Average Stat Rank: 14th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 10th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 14th, Average Percentile Rank: 14th.
Hall of Famers: RG Joe DeLamielleure (3x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl).
Other notable members: LG Reggie McKenzie (3x All-Pro), LT Dave Foley (1x Pro Bowl).
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famer, 6x All-Pro, 7x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: O.J Simpson (5x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl, Hall of Fame)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: None
As I’ve previously mentioned in this post I made a few months ago, the Bills line that blocked for O.J Simpson in his prime produced some of the most jaw-dropping seasons in modern NFL history, at least in terms of rushing yardage. In 1973 and 1975, this group paved the way for the two best rushing seasons of the Super Bowl era, adjusted for 14 games they ran for 3,520 and 3,398 rushing yards respectively. In 1973, OJ Simpson rushed for an adjusted 2,289 yards. In 1975, he rushed for an adjusted 2,077 yards, which would be the third best mark in history, and fullback/human bulldozer Jim Braxton (who actually outweighed a few members of the Electric Company, and many opposing defensive linemen at almost 250 pounds) ran for an adjusted 941 yards. Imagine some guy today very nearly breaking the yardage record and then his backup rushing for almost 1,000 yards as well and you’ll understand the kind of ridiculous stuff the Bills were pulling in the 70’s.
Alas, this group never quite racked up the rushing touchdown numbers of their competitors save for a few seasons, and by my research rushing touchdowns is often the primary stat that separates the historically significant lines from the others. They also had the unfortunate dishonor of being by far the least effective pass-blocking group of the 14, and actually didn’t even crack the top half of the league when it came to preventing sacks in their era by any metric over the six years that they were together.
A big problem with critiquing them is that one could make a strong argument that they blocked for the worst quarterback of anyone on this list in Joe Ferguson, a below average passer to speak highly of him. He managed one good year in 1975 and was either the definition of a game manager or total hot garbage every other year.
The final issue of course was lack of team success. They made the playoffs once in 1974 despite ludicrous rushing numbers in an era where rushing was paramount, and were promptly crushed by the Steel Curtain. While I’ve never quite liked this argument since they never had a defense or quarterback to help them along, it shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone that history fails to remember those without championship rings, even when we’re discussing the offensive line.
13. 1972-1978 ST. LOUIS CARDINALS
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 12th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 2nd, Average Stat Rank: 6th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 14th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 2nd, Average Percentile Rank: 13th.
Hall of Famers: RT Dan Dierdorf (6x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl).
Other notable members: RG Conrad Dobler (3x Pro Bowl), LT Ernie McMillan (4x Pro Bowl), LG Bob Young (1x All-Pro, 2x Pro Bowl).
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famer, 7x All-Pro, 15x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Terry Metcalf (3x Pro Bowl 1974-1975, 1977), Jim Otis (1x Pro Bowl 1975)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Jim Hart (4x Pro Bowl 1974-1977)
The best pass blocking offensive line of all-time is this low on the list? Kind of an example of why I included a few metrics that you can sift through, because once again this group was responsible for some really historic stuff that has rarely been seen again. They allowed only 9.1 adjusted sacks in 1975 (then an NFL record), and led the league in fewest sacks allowed three years in a row from 1974-1976 and led the league in lowest sack percentage from 1974-1978. That’s a very, very long time to be absolutely shutting down opposing pass rushes year in and year out. They even boasted a few pretty solid rushing seasons and consistently had strong rushing touchdown numbers, notably in 1975.
Ultimately though, the Cardinals took a while to find their wings. Conrad Dobler and Bob Young started for years before they became Pro Bowl players, Ernie McMillan was towards the end of his career when they started hitting their stride. Dan Dierdorf was the only constant that held everything together so there was a span I’ve included where they weren’t playing at peak performance and it hurt their averages. Overall though, really strong contender for best offensive line ever.
12. HOLMGREN’S SEAHAWKS (2001-2005)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 10th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 12th, Average Stat Rank: 13th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 7th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 13th, Average Percentile Rank: 12th.
Hall of Famers: LT Walter Jones (6x All-Pro, 9x Pro Bowl).
Other notable members: LG Steve Hutchinson (7x All-Pro, 7x Pro Bowl), C Robbie Tobeck (1x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famer, 13x All-Pro, 17x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Shaun Alexander (3x Pro Bowl 2003-2005, 2x All-Pro 2004-2005)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Matt Hasselbeck (1x Pro Bowl 2003)
Probably a bit of a surprise for many to see this group included. Probably the only line on this list that really had a side that never really became anything more than serviceable, nonetheless that left side of Walter Jones and Steve Hutchinson was about as good as anyone could ever ask for. Two of the best players at their position of the decade in their primes, both Hall of Famers (Hutchinson will be, I have no doubts), just absolutely smashing the opposition to pieces.
Tobeck was a good center as well, and one that probably should have made more than just his one Pro Bowl.
Obviously though, having two guys on the right side who played average at best led to some pretty rough pass protecting numbers.
Where the team shined was on the goalline, where the Seahawks could run a toss or power play to the left and pile up touchdowns on the ground with Shaun Alexander. This culminated in Alexander’s record-breaking MVP season in 2005 and a Super Bowl run that really put this group in the public consciousness.
11. LOMBARDI’S PACKERS (1959-1968)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 3rd, Passing Stat Average Rank: 13th, Average Stat Rank: 10th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 6th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 12th, Average Percentile Rank: 11th.
Hall of Famers: RG Jerry Kramer (7x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl), RT Forrest Gregg (9x All-Pro, 9x Pro Bowl), C Jim Ringo (9x All-Pro, 10x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: LG Fuzzy Thurston (4x All-Pro), LT Bob Skoronski (1x Pro Bowl), G Gale Gillingham (2x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 3 Hall of Famers, 32x All-Pro, 28x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Paul Hornung (2x All-Pro 1960-1961, 3x Pro Bowl 1959-1961), Jim Taylor (1x All-Pro 1962, 5x Pro Bowl 1960-1964) Tom Moore (1x Pro Bowl 1962), Donnie Anderson (1x Pro Bowl 1968)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Bart Starr (1x All-Pro 1966, 3x Pro Bowl 1960-1962, 1966)
Yeesh, that’s a lot of accolades.
This group kind of wrote the book on scoring touchdowns. Their adjusted total of 41.143 in 1962 is still to this day the best single season output for rushing touchdowns, and they had a few years that weren’t too far off. They had the most average touchdowns scored of any line in history.
Vince Lombardi’s famed Packer Sweep was almost an automatic touchdown anywhere within the ten yard line, mostly due to the dominance and flexibility of his tough, athletic and aggressive offensive line.
It’s tough to look at all those Hall of Famers and those combined accolades (although in a smaller NFL, it meant a little less) and find any fault, but there’s a reason they aren’t higher. To put it simply, this team just wasn’t good at pass-blocking. The only line on the list that allowed more sacks than them were the Electric Company, and this Packers group doesn’t have the luxury of claiming that their quarterback sucked because they protected Hall of Fame quarterback Bart Starr.
But if you value the accolades and touchdowns, this is your group.
10. DAVIS' RAIDERS (1966-1977)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 9th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 8th, Average Stat Rank: 9th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 9th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 7th, Average Percentile Rank: 10th.
Hall of Famers: LT Art Shell (4x All-Pro, 8x Pro Bowl), LG Gene Upshaw (7x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl) C Jim Otto (3x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl, all of the AFL accolades)
Other notable members: Bob Brown (Hall of Fame, 9x All-Pro, 6x-Pro Bowl, 2 each with Raiders), C Dave Dalby (1x Pro Bowl), RT Harry Schuh (1x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 3 (4) Hall of Famers, 24x All-Pro, 24x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl/All-AFL RB seasons: Clem Daniels (1x All-AFL 1966, 1x AFL All-Star 1966), Hewritt Dixon (1x All-AFL 1968, 3x AFL All-Star 1966-1968, 1x Pro Bowl 1970), Marv Hubbard (3x Pro Bowl 1971-1973)
Pro Bowl/All-AFL QB seasons: Tom Flores (AFL All-Star 1966), Daryle Lamonica (2x All-AFL 1967, 1969. 2x AFL All-Star 1967, 1969. 2x Pro Bowl 1970, 1972), Ken Stabler (4x Pro Bowl 1973-1974, 1976-1977. 1x All-Pro 1974)
Another star studded group.
I had the luxury of having to do percentiles for the 9 and 10 team AFL for this one, which throws off the general percentile averages a bit. But still, a line with three guys who made the NFL Network’s Top 100 Players of All-Time list a couple of years ago (another Hall of Famer if you count Bob Brown, who played at a pretty high level in his last 3 years with the Raiders). They were a consistently good pass blocking group for eleven years (an impressive feat by itself). Perhaps an even stronger case for this group is that they never had a running back who wasn’t a total bozo JAG nobody. They generally ran a running back by committee that struggled with yards per carry but was a constant force that wore down the opposition and racked up a fair amount of touchdowns.
What I love most is that this group was born through necessity. Oakland constantly had problems in the late AFL with beating Kansas City, because Kansas City had one of the best defensive lines in pro football at the time with Buck Buchanan, Curley Culp and Jerry Mays. So Al Davis strapped down and started investing everything he could in offensive line, and when the Steel Curtain seemed unstoppable they knew the only way to beat them was to go through them. Their time together concluded with an amazing performance in 1976 in which they beat up on the heavily favored Vikings and yet another defensive line that many saw as unbeatable.
9. 70’S-80’S RAMS (1976-1987)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 7th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 10th, Average Stat Rank: 11th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 8th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 10th, Average Percentile Rank: 9th.
Hall of Famers: RT Jackie Slater (5x All-Pro, 7x Pro Bowl), LG Tom Mack (8x All-Pro, 11x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: C Rich Saul (2x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), RG Dennis Harrah (1x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), LT Doug France (3x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl), LG Kent Hill (5x Pro Bowl), C Doug Smith (6x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 2 Hall of Famers, 19x All-Pro, 44x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Lawrence McCutcheon (2x Pro Bowl 1976-1977) Eric Dickerson (3x All-Pro 1983-1984, 1986. 3x Pro Bowl 1983-1984, 1986) Charles White (1x All-Pro 1987, 1x Pro Bowl 1987)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Pat Haden (1x Pro Bowl 1977)
Los Angeles could not stop stumbling into awesome offensive linemen in the 70’s and 80’s.
I was tempted to start this group’s table earlier because I actually missed their best season in 1973, but ultimately I decided the “core” of the group wasn’t quite established yet to be considered.
It didn’t matter who was in the backfield for nearly 20 years; if you were on the Rams you were going to get your yards. It didn’t matter if you were a pretty good back like Lawrence McCutcheon and Charles White, an all-time great like Eric Dickerson, or a committee backfield full of JAGs like the Rams had throughout the late 70’s. Whatever you were capable of, you were capable of twice as much with this group. They blocked for Eric Dickerson when he broke the single season rushing record, if that doesn’t tell you enough.
While they were by no means an elite pass blocking team throughout history, they were in many seasons amongst the best pass blocking teams of their era. All in all, a massively underappreciated but consistently dominant squad for a long, long time.
8. GREAT WALL OF DALLAS (1989-2000 Cowboys)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 13th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 5th, Average Stat Rank: 12th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 11th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 4th, Average Percentile Rank: 8th.
Hall of Famers: G Larry Allen (7x All-Pro, 11x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: LG Nate Newton (2x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), RT Erik Williams, (3x All-Pro, 4x Pro Bowl), LT Mark Tuinei (2x Pro Bowl) Mark Stepnoski (3x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), G Kevin Gogan (1x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl), LT Flozell Adams (1x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), C Ray Donaldson (6x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famer, 17x All-Pro, 42x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Emmitt Smith (4x All-Pro 1992-1995, 7x Pro Bowl 1991-1995, 1998-1999)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Troy Aikman (6x Pro Bowl 1991-1996)
For most, I think this is the line that comes to mind when you’re asked “who was the greatest offensive line of all time”?
And let me be clear, this isn’t a bad answer at all. This line (in my opinion) single-handedly started an arms race in the NFL to get the biggest and baddest guys that you could on one line to just beat the shit out of anyone you played against. To this day, one of the most physically talented and imposing groups of men in history. I attribute the massive ballooning in size of the average lineman in the 90’s to the success that this group achieved by virtue of the fact that no one was strong enough to handle the power they possessed. In big games, this group had a tendency to absolutely crush defenses.
Blocking for the NFL’s all-time leading rusher is a resume builder all by itself, not to mention that year in and year out they kept Troy Aikman as clean as any QB in the league. What’s most impressive to me is how they were able to stay consistently good for so long. It helped having Larry Allen (who I consider to be the best offensive lineman of all time), who was an incredibly versatile player who could perform at near an All-Pro level at any of the four offensive line positions outside of center. Erik Williams for almost a half decade looked to be Hall of Fame bound, constantly shutting down the likes of Reggie White and Chris Doleman before a car accident cut his elite career short.
7. THE HOGS (1981-1992 Redskins)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 11th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 4th, Average Stat Rank: 7th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 12th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 3rd, Average Percentile Rank: 7th.
Hall of Famers: G Russ Grimm (4x All-Pro, 4x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: T Joe Jacoby (3x All-Pro, 4x Pro Bowl), C Jim Lachey (4x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl), C Jeff Bostic (1x All-Pro, 1x Pro Bowl), RG Mark May (1x Pro Bowl), G R.C Thielemann (1x All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowl), G Mark Schlereth (2x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famers, 4x All-Pro, 18x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: John Riggins (1x All-Pro 1983, 1x Pro Bowl 1983), Earnest Byner (2x Pro Bowl 1990-1991)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Joe Theismann (1x All-Pro 1983, 2x Pro Bowl 1982-1983), Mark Rypien (2x Pro Bowl 1989, 1991)
One of the most storied lines in history, well known for their awesome nickname and being the fuel for The Diesel in 1983 when John Riggins broke the record for touchdowns by a running back in a season and won the Super Bowl.
While a line with some decent end-of-year awards to their name (Russ Grimm a pretty famous name as both a player and coach, Jacoby as one of the first 300 pounders to make a name for himself as an elite-level talent), I was somewhat underwhelmed by the statistics and accolades for this group. Then I remembered that their best running back was 34 years old and their best quarterback was from the CFL, and those really impressive sack and rushing touchdown numbers start to mean a little more. Not to mention the quality of longevity; this group was together for almost 11 years and consistently were able to have strong seasons.
6. PAYTON’S SAINTS (2007-2011)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 14th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 1st, Average Stat Rank: 8th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 13th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 1st, Average Percentile Rank: 6th.
Hall of Famers: None.
Other notable members: LG Carl Nicks (2x All-Pro, 2x Pro Bowl), RG Jahri Evans (5x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), C Jonathan Goodwin (1x Pro Bowl), Jammal Brown (1x All-Pro, 2x Pro Bowl) Jermon Bushrod (2x Pro Bowl), RT Zach Strief (1x PFF All-Pro?)
Total Accolades: 7x All-Pro, 11x Pro Bowl, 1x PFF All-Pro (hell yeah)
Pro Bowl RB seasons: None.
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Drew Brees (2x All-Pro 2009, 2011. 5x Pro Bowl 2007-2011)
Probably the most unlikely group to have made this list, and for good reason. While a really good group, I overestimated some things before delving in further.
I’ll start by saying this; in no way do I think this wasn’t a good offensive line. In fact, for a few years in that time span I definitely wouldn’t hesitate to say there were probably the most effective group. Even though they have been our smallest sample thus far, the fact that they were able to have such consistent pass blocking success in a 32 team league in order to come to the percentile scores they did is a pretty good look (and I love Drew Brees, but I don’t know if I’d call him Brady/Manning esque when it comes to avoiding sacks with quick releases). Not to mention they even managed to throw in a few years where they had a pretty damn intimidating run game without really having much in the way of talent in their backfield. Winning a Super Bowl in 2009 makes a strong case as well. But when you compare them to a line that was almost equally as good at pass protection like the 70’s Cardinals who did it for almost twice as long, it’s tough to compare them.
The problem with them is that
a) they weren’t together all that long.
b) they never had much of a commitment to the run game.
c) there really wasn’t a clear cut “leader”. Jahri Evans made a lot of Pro Bowls in a row, but I think for the years where he was at his best Carl Nicks was probably the best player on that line.
5. 70’S DOLPHINS (1971-1979)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 2nd, Passing Stat Average Rank: 9th, Average Stat Rank: 2nd, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 5th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 8th, Average Percentile Rank: 5th.
Hall of Famers: RG Larry Little (7x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), C Jim Langer (6x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: Bob Kuechenberg (3x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), RT Norm Evans (2x Pro Bowl) C Bob DeMarco (3x Pro Bowl), LT Wayne Moore (1x Pro Bowl), RT Mike Current (1x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 2 Hall of Famers, 16x All-Pro, 24x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Larry Csonka (3x All-Pro 1971-1973, 4x Pro Bowl 1971-1974), Mercury Morris (2x Pro Bowl 1972-1973) Delvin Williams (1x All-Pro 1978, 1x Pro Bowl 1978)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Bob Griese (2x All-Pro 1971, 1977. 5x Pro Bowl 1971, 1973-1974, 1977-1978), Earl Morrall (1x All-Pro 1972)
The line that propelled the famed undefeated season in 1972, this group has a very strong case for best of all time.
While maybe not the most star-studded, consistently was a top five group in almost every respect from pass blocking to road grading. Paving the way for Csonka, Kiick and Morris in 1972 they set an insane precedent for how to win in the 70’s by rushing for 3383 adjusted yards and almost 30 touchdowns. While this record was later broken by the Electric Company Bills in the following year, the fact that Shula rode this running game all the way to NFL history like he did is an achievement all their own.
They could have stood to be a little better in pass protection, even though the game managers they blocked for owed them their careers. When Bob Griese went down in 1972, this group didn’t even flinch and rode backup Earl Morrall to an All-Pro undefeated season, despite the fact he couldn’t step up into a pocket to save his life. Even when Csonka, Kiick and Morris all left the team, this group continued to have really strong run games.
4. BROWN’S BROWNS (1958-1967)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 1st, Passing Stat Average Rank: 11th, Average Stat Rank: 3rd, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 4th, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 11th, Average Percentile Rank: 4th.
Hall of Famers: LT/K Lou Groza (6x All-Pro, 9x Pro Bowl), RT Mike McCormack (9x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), RG Gene Hickerson (7x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: LG Jim Ray Smith (5x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), C Art Hunter (1x Pro Bowl), C John Morrow (2x Pro Bowl), LT Dick Schafrath (4x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl), RG John Wooten (1x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 3 Hall of Famers, 31x All-Pro, 36x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Jim Brown (6x All-Pro 1958-1961, 1963-1965. 7x Pro Bowl 1958-1965) Leroy Kelly (2x All-Pro 1966-1967, 2x Pro Bowl 1966-1967)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Milt Plum (2x Pro Bowl 1960-1961), Frank Ryan (3x Pro Bowl 1964-1966)
The pairing of this group and Jim Brown goes down as one of the finest in history, and presents an interesting question.
Obviously, Jim Brown was good at football. Obviously, this was an exceptional offensive line. The stats can back up both of these conclusions. The Browns, on average, ranked 1.9th league wide in yards per carry through the ten years of this group’s existence, a remarkable 7 out of 10 times having led the league and never once dropping out of the top 5. In my opinion, that’s the single most impressive stat on the entire spreadsheet.
Jim Brown broke and still holds the record for yards per carry for a running back, in spite of the Browns’ quarterbacks and defenses being largely mediocre if not worse. The Browns won two championships in this span, and the line continued to produce All-Pro seasons when Leroy Kelly replaced Jim Brown in 1966.
They weren’t quite the best pass blockers to ever exist, as a matter of fact they were generally middle of the road or a smidgen above that mark. But their ridiculous, unbreakable records when it comes to pounding the ball more than overcomes any deficiencies they had in that regard.
3. THE NEW GREAT WALL (2014-Present Cowboys)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 8th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 3rd, Average Stat Rank: 5th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 1st, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 9th, Average Percentile Rank: 3rd.
Hall of Famers: None, yet
Other notable members: LT Tyron Smith (4x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), RG Zack Martin (4x All-Pro, 4x Pro Bowl), C Travis Frederick (3x All-Pro, 4x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 11x All-Pro, 13x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: DeMarco Murray (1x All-Pro 2014, 1x Pro Bowl 2014), Ezekiel Elliott (1x All-Pro 2016, 1x Pro Bowl 2016
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Tony Romo (1x Pro Bowl 2014), Dak Prescott (1x Pro Bowl 2016)
This may come on a little strong, but I fully believe that this group will go down as one of the best in history.
Obviously their position in this “ranking” is corrupted by the fact that they only have four seasons to judge them by and they will obviously go through a 'down' season sometime, but in a lot of ways the pieces are there.
Zack Martin has been the best guard in the entire NFL since day one and I have almost no doubts that he’ll become a Hall of Famer, if not one of the best guards ever, at this rate. Tyron Smith is consistently considered the best tackle, or at least top three, in the league. Travis Frederick isn’t far off from being considered the best center of this era. This is a seriously unique, especially talented young group that we’re dealing with in the modern age. To see them year in and year out get all of these accolades while on the same group is a remarkable achievement, not to mention how the ‘ancillary’ players like Ronald Leary and Doug Free are fringe Pro Bowlers themselves.
Their performance with Elliott his rookie year was astounding, a rookie hasn’t made such a strong impression from that position since Eric Dickerson and he has his line to thank for that. As the Cowboys continue to invest in the offensive line positions and keep a focus on maintaining this group, the small part of me that doesn’t despise Jerry Jones more than any other football personality wants this team to win a Super Bowl at some point to cement their legacy as one of the best groups of all time.
2. VERMEIL’S CHIEFS (2001-2006)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 4th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 7th, Average Stat Rank: 1st, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 2nd, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 6th, Average Percentile Rank: 2nd.
Hall of Famers: LT Willie Roaf (9x All-Pro, 11x Pro Bowl), RG Will Shields (7x All-Pro, 12x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: LG Brian Waters (2x All-Pro, 6x Pro Bowl, 1x AFC Ground Player of the Week), C Casey Wiegmann (1x Pro Bowl), RT John Tait (1x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 2 Hall of Famers, 18x All-Pro, 31x Pro Bowl, 1x AFC Ground Player of the Week
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Priest Holmes (3x All-Pro 2001-2003, 3x Pro Bowl 2001-2003), Larry Johnson (2x All-Pro 2005-2006, 2x Pro Bowl 2005-2006)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: Trent Green (2x Pro Bowl 2003, 2005)
If you all would allow me to show my hand, this is probably my pick as the best offensive line ever, at least to this point.
They weren’t together for too long. The Chiefs lucked out with Roaf and Shields playing some of their best football on the absolute final stretch of their careers, having underperforming first round tackle John Tait play much better on the right side, Wiegmann being the line manager they needed and former college fullback/tight end Brian Waters somehow emerging into one of the best guards in the league but somehow for a five year span this was as good an offensive line that ever existed.
For three years in a row they led the 32 team NFL in rushing touchdowns (and never dropped out of the top six in their time together), breaking Emmitt Smith’s record from 1995 by paving the way for Priest Holmes to score 28 touchdowns in 2003 (and as I detail in this post, that wasn’t even close to his best season behind this group).
Blocking for Larry Johnson in 2005 without Tait, they may have even been better. Had Johnson started the entire season, his per game averages extrapolated into the best season a running back has ever had, ever. I hardly find it a coincidence that two of the best running back seasons of all time and one of the best red zone offenses in NFL history were spearheaded by this incredible group.
  1. SHANAHAN’S BRONCOS (1995-1999)
Rushing Stat Average Rank: 5th, Passing Stat Average Rank: 6th, Average Stat Rank: 4th, Rushing Stat Percentile Rank: 3rd, Passing Stat Percentile Rank: 5th, Average Percentile Rank: 1st.
Hall of Famers: Gary Zimmerman (8x All-Pro, 7x Pro Bowl)
Other notable members: C Tom Nalen (3x All-Pro, 5x Pro Bowl), G Mark Schlereth (2x Pro Bowl)
Total Accolades: 1 Hall of Famer, 12x All-Pro, 14x Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl RB seasons: Terrell Davis (3x All-Pro 1996-1998, 3x Pro Bowl 1996-1998)
Pro Bowl QB seasons: John Elway (3x Pro Bowl 1996-1998)
Surprised to see this group anti-climatically top the list? You have nothing on me, who after hours and hours compiling this spreadsheet had to come to grips with the fact that, according to my metrics, this seemingly unremarkable group was the best offensive line ever.
After a while, I came to grips with it. It’s hard to argue that this wasn’t a dominant span of offensive for a group of linemen. Even if you say Elway’s pocket presence influenced the sack numbers and Shanahan’s newfangled zone-blocking scheme influenced the run game, the fact remains that over the very short duration that this group was together they were undoubtedly better than almost every other line in the league, to a degree that no other line on this list has been for their duration.
They led the league in rushing multiple times, they protected the quarterback with a frequency that any offensive coordinator would want, and they won two Super Bowls in a row. That’s quite a bevy of accomplishments over five years (even if that isn’t exactly the largest sample size).
At the same time, it raises all of the concerns I have with this model. This group holds this spot on the rankings because (as I make clear in this other post detailing the top 100 rushing offenses of all time) the 90’s sucked when it came to rushing offense. It took a pretty moderately good season in the scope of things to lead the league or be top five in rushing in the decade, so the meh totals that we saw from this group tended to dominate the NFL landscape of the time.
TL;DR:
If you think it's important to rank these units by how good they were at the time they played, I would generally judge by the Percentile Score. If you think the should be judged irrespective of time, use Average Score.
Accolades Percentile Score Rank Average Score Rank Compiled Score Rank
1972-1977 Bills 1 HOF, 6x All-Pro 7x Pro Bowl 14th 14th 14th
1972-1978 Cardinals 1 HOF, 7x All-Pro, 15x Pro Bowl 13th 6th T8th
2001-2005 Seahawks 1 HOF, 13x All-Pro, 17x Pro Bowl 12th 13th 13th
1959-1968 Packers 3 HOF, 32x All-Pro, 28x Pro Bowl 11th T9th T10th
1966-1977 Raiders 3 (4?) HOF, 24x All-Pro, 24x Pro Bowl 10th T9th T8th
1976-1987 Rams 2 HOF, 19x All-Pro, 44x Pro Bowl 9th 11th T10th
1989-2000 Cowboys 1 HOF, 17x All-Pro, 42x Pro Bowl 8th 12th T10th
1981-1992 Redskins 1 HOF, 14x All-Pro, 18x Pro Bowl 7th T8th 7th
2007-2011 Saints 7x All-Pro, 11x Pro Bowl 6th T8th 6th
1971-1979 Dolphins 2 HOF, 16x All-Pro, 24x Pro Bowl 5th 2nd T3rd
1958-1967 Browns 3 HOF, 31x All-Pro, 36x Pro Bowl 4th T3rd T3rd
2014-2018 Cowboys 11x All-Pro, 13x Pro Bowl 3rd 5th 5th
2001-2006 Chiefs 2 HOF, 18x All-Pro, 31x Pro Bowl 2nd 1st 1st
1995-1999 Broncos 1 HOF, 12x All-Pro, 14x Pro Bowl 1st T3rd 2nd
All stats compiled on Pro Football Reference.
After seemingly months of torture over this project, I’m out. Remember to like, comment and subscribe.
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2017.06.09 16:46 JaguarGator9 [OC] Draft Facts (8/32): Pittsburgh Steelers

Pittsburgh Steelers
Tomorrow's Team: Atlanta Falcons
NFC North AFC North
Chicago Bears Cincinnati Bengals
Detroit Lions Cleveland Browns
Green Bay Packers Baltimore Ravens
Minnesota Vikings Pittsburgh Steelers
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2014.09.29 18:57 messiah69 September 26, 2014 - Love Actually (2003)

Love Actually

Director: Richard Curtis

Starting: Hugh Grant, Martine McCutcheon, Liam Neeson

Love Actually, a 2003 British Christmas-themed romantic comedy film, was written and directed by Richard Curtis.
Follows the lives of eight very different couples in dealing with their love lives in various loosely interrelated tales all set during a frantic month before Christmas in London, England.

Info:

  • Rating: R
  • Running Time: 135 Minutes
  • Genre: Comedy Drama Romance
  • Release Date: November 14, 2003
  • Language(s): English Portuguese French
  • IMDb user rating: 7.7/10
  • Rotten Tomatoes critic:63% positive reviews
  • Rotten Tomatoes critic rating: 6.4/10

Links:

Streaming Options:

Discussion topic(s):

PLEASE DON'T RUIN ANY MOVIE FOR ANYONE WHO HASN'T SEEN IT!
To include a spoiler, write your comments in square brackets eg. [spoiler] immediately followed by (/spoiler). This will show up like this: spoiler.
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